Charles Hall novel Summer's Gone

 

 

 

 

 

About Charles Hall :

 

Grew up in Perth in the sixties... Perth was a very quiet little place, a million miles from anywhere, and it was like living in a remote country town. I finished school in 1965, and by ’67 I was nineteen and playing guitar in a local Perth rock band, and full of doubt and uncertainty about pretty much everything. I got in with some people who had just arrived from Melbourne — and back then, anyone from ‘The Eastern States’ was a strange, superior being, possibly from another planet. So my life changed quite abruptly, and I was mixing with writers and musicians and artists and poets, both local and from Melbourne, and it was like a bomb had gone off underneath me. Pretty soon I was hitching across the Nullarbor to Melbourne to start a whole new life.

 

1967 has always stood out, for me, as the year everything changed. It was my coming of age year. And I’ve always thought, ‘There’s a story in there, about what a different place Australia was.’ There was a lot of stuff going on that seems quite outrageous now, like the shame and moral stigma attached to the ‘unmarried mother’. And other things, too: guys of twenty, who were too young to drink in a pub, let alone vote, were conscripted into the Army to fight in the most extreme, horrible conditions in the jungles of Vietnam. And on top of all that, the pubs were shut on Sundays! A different world, indeed

 

Charles Hall's '90s band The McQuades on YouTube...

       

Gemini reunite to play Sunshine River one last time...